Would You Consider Home-Education?

Would You Consider Home-Education?
15 April 2016

Have you ever contemplated home-educating your child? Or, indeed, are you already choosing to do so?

I was fascinated to read a Guardian piece about the fact that home-educating seems to be on the rise.

The paper reports:

"Nobody knows exactly how many children are being educated at home because many parents are under no obligation to tell the authorities. But freedom of information responses provided to Education Guardian indicate numbers are rising. Responses from 134 of England's 153 local education authorities list 30,298 children as receiving home education in 2014-15. Of these, 13,007 are of primary age, and 17,291 of them are between 11 and 16."

It's a topic that's not without controversy but I'm going to throw my hands up and admit that if I had my time over as a mum, I think I'd have a shot at home-schooling.

Why? Because I love the idea of ditching long-division in favour of geography when the sun is shining and you live in an area of outstanding natural beauty with some of the world's most beautiful beaches on your doorstep. I can't understand how school has become what it is, and while my kids aren't exactly complaining about going, some days I send them to school with a heavy heart, wondering if mainstream education is really the best we can do for them.

I glance over their homework and feel sorry that we're asking kids to regurgitate the dictionary instead of finding more inventive ways to foster a love of language and learning.

And yes, I get that school includes an element of crowd control and thus it's unrealistic to expect my kids to have an education that's tailor-made to their individual interests and whatever the weather is doing on any given day.

But what I'm trying to say is simply that I'm not a bit surprised to read that home-education appears to be on the rise. Plenty of the parents I know feel increasingly disenfranchised with society, so sacking off school in favour of a different way of learning makes some sense to me.

It's just that I lack the nerve, creativity and - crucially - the patience to actually do anything about it. So off they trot to school as the years tick by and I wonder if I've done them a disservice by lacking the courage of my convictions.

But what's your view? Would you ever contemplate home-educating your kids and - whatever your answer - why? Come and tell us on our Facebook page or leave a comment below.


TOPICS:   Parents

270 comments

  • Nicola G.

    If i knew how i would. X

    • Helen M.

      You know how :) you send a letter to the school de registering and then start your journey :)

    • Nicola G.

      I struggle doing his homework never mind full on lessons :hushed: id have to go to school to school him :joy:

    • Helen M.

      What is your son interested in? You don't need to be doing lessons :) Life is lessons enough!

    • Nicola G.

      Dont you have to learn them the same as you do in school maths english science etc? He likes quiet alot he just wont settle down to do his homework. He hates maths and stuff x

    • Tessa F.

      There are lots of maths games sites online. As well as other subjects. Mine use reading eggs and maths seed. Maths xl. Khan academy. Bbc bite size. Just google maths (or wat ever subject) games and it will bring up loads.

    • Nicola G.

      Ill have a look into thank you

  • Nicola G.

    But also think school gives them and routine and stability so i duno pros and cons on it x

    • Chris S.

      Home education can give a child those things too. You can follow routine if that's what suits you, or you can provide an education suitable to your child's individual needs if that works better for you. That's the beauty of home educating. No two families HE in the same way.x

  • Louise B.

    Id love to teach my kids at home but i wouldnt know what to do lol

    • Louise R.

      Join some groups and find out

    • Nadine M.

      There are so many groups out there for home ed and it is so social! U could literally do something twice a day with other kids x

    • Nicola R.

      Could you give us a starting point?

    • guest

      Nicola R just look on FB plenty of groups. Google info about HE. It really is easier then you think :-)

    • Charlie C.

      Whatever you want. Some stick to a curriculum. Some are semi structured so follow sone subjects. Some are child led and sone unschool and do no formal work. The best thing about home ed is that the education is tailored to each child/family

  • Michelle M.

    I'm thinking about it

    • Helen M.

      do iiiit :)

  • Kerry D.

    With all the upcoming changes in education I think it will get more and more popular!

  • Melissa A.

    Personally no. I'm a teacher and although I know I'd be able to teach my children myself I want them to go to school for socialising aswell. There are certain things that can't be taught at home x

    • Kayleigh T.

      Just out of curiosity, what are the things that can not be taught at home?

    • Melissa A.

      Being part of a class, socialising and making peers (yes this can be done to a certain extent) understanding the diversity of a school classroom, certain routines. Home schooling has its benefits but can't gain access to everything however it has pros in terms of 1:1 education.

      That's just what I feel personally. It's whatever suits the individual. I know my little girl will love nursery in September so she can make some friends as we don't have that much opportunity

    • Kayleigh T.

      Completely understandable, I just like to hear what we could possibly be missing from attending a school. I think it's good for us to look at both sides to make informed choices :)

    • Melissa A.

      Oh absolutely! To be fair I think it's going to be more popular with the way things are going in education. X

    • Helen M.

      Missing out on being bullied, ignored, told to shut up. Not to mention 'no you can't go to the toilet yet' and in this amazing place of socialization, being told to stop talking!

    • Melissa A.

      Helen not all children are bullied. It is highly unfortunate for those that are. Also.. not once do I say a child can't go to the toilet and nor do I tell them to stop talking. It's important to communicate both in class and on the playground although with anything of course there are boundaries. You can't molly coddle for ever and they need to experience the world as harsh as it is sometimes these are life lessons.

    • Melissa A.

      Also I'd like to reiterate that I see the benefits of both home and school. We teach our children from birth so to me having both gives the perfect start for our little ones. As I've said before though, everyone is different and what may suit one may not suit another.

    • guest

      Melissa A Most children are bullied. You'd be surprised, even others making your esteem low is detrimental to learning. Of course there are boundaries but these are school boundaries, which harsh life lessons do they need to learn?! Bullying by any chance? Is it how we learn to cope with life as adults because this is the accepted way of the world?! Well I disagree. Bullying is not acceptable anywhere, neither are 'harsh life lessons'.

    • Tricia F.

      The 'harsh life lessons' our primary age kids are learning at the hands of those who believe they must at an increasingly young age are the most likely cause of the increase in teenage depression

      Single age classrooms teach children nothing of the world they are about to enter, where people of differing ages, needs, abilities, strengths and weaknesses exist. The current target of school is to ensure everybody is the same. The last person who tried to achieve that had a tiny moustache we both fear and ridicule even today

      Home education is a complete misnomer, certainly in *this* city. It's community education. And we're on the boundary of four different groups. There's over 600 *known* FAMILIES (more than double that for *child* figures) HE in our city. I've not included those over the boundary we mix with too. I'm fairly confident there's no school can offer that sort of opportunity for 'socialisation', and breadth of education we're all achieving individually together

      We're also packing far more 'education' into our days, as it has already been proven that a child in a classroom receives a mere 60-90 mins educational instruction per day, after all the herding and breaks are discounted. That's not even individual attention, which is probably less than ten minutes per day per child. It's not an environment conducive to creating a lifelong love of learning really. It's a machine for churning out OFSTED figures, and heaven help the child or family that fails to satisfy the drive to produce those figures

      It's interesting how many people who have had absolutely no experience of 'home education' deem themselves to be experts on how much of a 'failure' it has to be

    • guest

      Helen M most children are not bullied, yes some will be, but you know what that doesn't stop at school. there are bullies everywhere, from swimming classes, to brownies, to the workplace. my child is happy confident and thriving at school, she loves every aspect of it, the uniform, the routine, her teacher, her friends, she loves coming home and telling us all the exciting things she has learnt and made and about all the funny things her friends have done. I have no desire to home school as I don't agree with it, I loved going to school and my daughter loves it. she goes to a great school, I wouldn't want to deprive my child of the joy and the memories I have as a child. I have amazing memories of school holidays at home but it's my school memories that make me laugh the most.

    • Louise R.

      So what would you do if she hated school make her put up with it because you liked school as a child its great your child loves school but everyone is not the same we are all unique home educated children also have great memories and great friends

    • Melissa A.

      I'm not going to argue over this. I've said I see the good in both so not prepared to have the home schooling squad on my case. We all have our own preferred ways of educating and I think a balance of both is perfect. I'll leave it at that.

    • guest

      Louise R she would still go to school, I would just find her a school that suited her. we look at about 10 schools for her before we made our decision to find the right one for her. just because she doesn't like something doesn't mean she doesn't do it. it's all down to the school and the support at the school. my son is a polar opposite to my daughter so he probably might not like school but he'll go to pre school at 2 just like my daughter did, I'm not going to keep him at home just in case he doesn't like it.

    • guest

      Fab responses Melissa A. My girl also feels the same as your child regarding school. She's had the same close lovely friends since she was 2 at pre school and is now thriving in reception at 5 years old. She adores her teachers especially as she had a chronic illness they really look after her and enjoys after school activities such as gymnastics etc... she doesn't stop talking when I pick her up from school... tells me good things and who was in trouble that day :joy:. Glad you stood your ground. We are all different x

    • Marianne B.

      I wonder how learning to be part of a class (hierarchy maybe?) and certain routines are applicable to adult life? Not a criticism I'mkjust wondering as it feels maybe these are skills that are specific to a school environment?

    • Stephanie M.

      I don't think it's anything to do with hierarchy.... just to learn how to work in a group and be part of a team on a daily basis... as you do in adult life... I'm sure school helps immensley with this but I'm also sure home Ed mums incorporate this too somehow.

  • Rebecca B.

    School is good for social skills and for mixing with a good range of people from different backgrounds.

    • Chris S.

      The same could be said about Home Education!

    • Rebecca B.

      Not really when the child predominantly sees the parent(s) during the day but not necessarily other children their age every single day.

    • guest

      Rebecca B HE families are out all the time socialising with other children of different backgrounds & ages. We don't sit at home mon-fri :-)

  • Tara G.

    If I thought I was brainy enough and knew what to teach. And know I could keep there attention I'd love to. But I think them going up school they are more likely sit and listen and also it gives them more friends. I was an army brat and although I was at school I went to several different ones as we were posted around. But I made no life long friends as I only knew them for 2 years max. I don't want that for my children.

    • Ruth B.

      I have lots of friends. I went to one primary school and one secondary school. Most of my classmates were from the same primary. Within 12mths of leaving school I lost touch with every single one. I do however have friends from my jobs over the years and have friends that I have been close to for well over 10 years. Honestly, not everyone makes lifelong friends in school. Of my 4 adult children, only one has remained close friends with someone from schools and that is one single friend not a group.

  • Nadine M.

    We did it for a year as my daughter couldnt get into school, year r, but she flourished at home, we went on days out with home education groups, they get the same discount as schools for trips, we taught her to read and write and it was easy, a school came up and we asked her and she wanted to go, but we havent noticed any amazing improvement in her, she just has more structure now, but it was a really good year, we went away loads (cheaper) and if i didnt have 2 other younger ones i would have carried on!

  • Sarah W.

    My daughter was nearly 3 when we met an 8 year old at our local pool who was home schooled. The little girl was lovely but I noticed and so did my childless friend on a separate occasion that the girl seemed to crave children. I would love to home school but I also feel children need children and I am flying solo with mine.

    • Jane C.

      To be fair though that is just one experience. I totally agree with you, children need to be social. Humans need to be social. I home educate and my home is constantly taken over by my children and their friends throughout the week. It's exhausting and my home is messy but it is very important that they socialise. There are so many groups now too. Just a quick search on here and you'll find so many home ed meet ups. We go to museums with a home ed group regularly and there are park meet ups, Lego clubs, science groups all sorts :blush::thumbsup_tone2:

    • Melanie T.

      what stage are you planning on educating your child to?

  • daisy

    Yes, absolutely I would consider it. I think the more that do it the more it quashes the 'socialisation' myth - which I believe is a myth as the home schooled kids I've met have been far more sociable and chatty to me than kids who went to the local high school. They actually knew how to talk to adults! Considering it for our son next year as he really doesn't enjoy the school system, he is bright but it's deadening his enthusiasm and interest :-( that's hard as a parent, I think we could do better by him.

  • Jody B.

    I wish I could afford too, especially as my little man has severe problems with chronic consitpation..I'm terrified about how the school will support him with it, and the bullying that will probably come from his peers :pensive:

    • Louise R.

      It can be as cheap as you won't it to be have you joined any groups to find out more

    • Jody B.

      Cant afford not to work :neutral_face:

    • guest

      Jody B lots of people home educated and still work.

    • Chris S.

      You do not have to copy or keep to school hours, education can happen any time. Lots of families work and home educate. And because HE is so efficient you can cover a lot more work in a shorter time. So much time at school is wasted so you really don't have to spend hours every day "teaching".

    • Laura T.

      If you work as you need the money and home educate you'd still need to pay childcare for your child and no nurseries or childminders would likely take a 10 year old (for example) for the day. Plus if you worked a 12 hour day there wouldn't be time to teach your kid too. Great if you can and want to home educate but not realistic for a lot of families.

  • Louise R.

    We do its amazing lots of groups and organised activities some kids love school some don't so it's important to have different options to suit different children one size won't fit all

  • Melanie T.

    school is about so much more than just learning what's in a curriculum, it teaches you social skills, independence, different influences from different people, it teaches them about rules and regulations too. a school opens a child's world more than a parent ever can,

    • Sam N.

      Yeah...I hate to say it but I completely and utterly disagree with you. If a parent can not ever teach a child everything they need to know, why would we become parents? You simply need to encourage your child to love to learn. The rest they will do themselves with guidance. Trust me, schools, in general, are failing our children in this aspect because of the curriculum, because of testing and not nurturing interests and trying to make each child compliant. Don't get me wrong, it's healthy to learn all of this but school settings now are not the way to develop our children's futures. It's impossible for 1 teacher and 1 TA to give all 30 kids what they need all of the time. It is possible for a parent to spend time with their children and find out what makes them tick and develop them as individuals with their own interests. By the way, I am a teacher. I see disengaged students all day everyday. It breaks my heart.

    • Nicola R.

      Why do people think school is the only place to socialise their children - I never felt more alone in my life than when I was at secondary school. Hated it. For me going to school was like a prison sentence, and I wasn't bullied anymore than most.

    • Melanie T.

      I'm not going to argue with you, I've given my opinion. yes I agree that the school system isn't perfect but neither is teaching your child at home. I don't know many parents who are clever enough or know enough to take a child from early years to a level. I know that I would be doing my child a disservice if I tried to teach them, human biology a level or physic GCSE because I have no interest in science. I can see how a parent might think they can teach a primary curriculum, but not a secondary curriculum especially not past year 9. i knew a couple of homeschooled kids and all they craved was to be at school, to have time away from their parents, to go on a school trip with friends, I used to think they were lucky because they could be at home, but I now see now we are adults that they have missed out on so much.

    • Sarah H.

      This is quite hilarious. My son meets children every single day, unless he asks for a day at home. Children not just his age, like he would in a school but children ranging from newborn to around 8. He can 'socialise' with children of all ages, which school children find it very hard to, as they are only with the same aged children day in day out.

      My son is only 3 and 4m at the moment but he asks me questions all the time that I'm not sure what the answer is (mainly at the moment about dinosaurs) so we find out together and I love the fact that I am learning with him. It is amazing how many people that were un schooled and have gone on to get their masters, from fairly recent articles.

      Also, my son is very close to me and I struggle to see how forcing him into a school will encourage independence? Surely by me helping him and giving him the confidence he needs to go off and be independent is better than forcing him into an environment he is totally uncomfortable with?!

      Can I ask Melanie, do you not have rules at home? Does your child not go to swimming, Cubs, martial art etc? They learn rules there! Why do people think that school is the be all and end all?

      I gave up work at 23 to be a full time mum, thanks to an amazing business we got introduced to, so my qualifications and all my years at school did me no good at all! Likewise my husband has a good job but none of the qualifications that he got have helped him get it at all, they were useless. Schools programme children to go out and get good jobs, to be employed! What about being their own boss and building their own businesses. Schools condition children to be the 'norm' and I for one want more than that for my Son.

      While children are learning about caves and rock pools from a text book, me and my amazingly bright little man will be on a beach, talking about how caves were made, exploring them and finding all the things that live in rock pools. Now you tell me, which one is real life :wink:

    • Melanie T.

      of course we have rules at home! she goes to swimming and rainbows. she's been in a learning environment outside the home since she was 2, she's now 5 1/2 and in reception. pre school hasn't done her any harm and she is thriving at school. her school have well my Wednesday where they look at nature, they do so many activities that are not on the curriculum, they are stimulating her mind in a way I couldn't do at home. when it's the holidays we do loads of other educational stuff like nature walks, museums, foreign holidays where she loves learning about other places. we take her motor racing (as her dad competes) so she mixes mainly with adults and older children in the holidays. schools don't just teach you to be employed, there are so many initiatives within schools that help encourage entrepreneurship, princes trust, young enterprise, inter school competitions. schools encourage, with the help of home, to be whatever you want to be, they teach you that you get out what you put in.

    • guest

      Sarah H I have a job where I don't use my degree, but the experiences and things I did at university helped me get the job, you are forgetting that to get the qualifications, there are several years of projects and other tasks and experiences that you do in order to get the qualification. that is what the education is, it's not the end piece of paper, I learnt skills that I have been able to apply in so many other aspects of life

    • guest

      Melanie T yes but you are failing to see that children won't make it out of school in one piece at this rate! Exams from 5 years old?! Do you honestly think that kind of pressure is ok, for a extremely young child?!

    • guest

      Melanie T you said that schools give children rules and regulations, yet you've just said that she has learnt rules from other places ..... so, school isn't the place where they learn rules.

      You've said said in a way 'you couldn't do at home' many people including myself feel that we can, hence why we have decided to home educate.

      There were 2 teachers on this morning the other day, explaining why they took their two children out and it had nothing to do with the fact they were teachers but saw that they education system is becoming an absolute mess

    • Melanie T.

      doesn't bother me, my child will cope as will all the children in her class because of the way the school is structured, children will make it out in one piece, that is a ridiculous statement to make. children are more adaptable then we give them credit for.

    • guest

      Sarah H that is 2 teachers out of a profession of thousands, I know several teachers and none of them would home school. I'm more than happy with my daughters school, I spent hundreds of hours picking the right school for her, so I have no problems with the education system as it stands at the moment, I have faith in it because I believe it works. i don't want to home school either of my children.

    • Sarah H.

      That's your choice Melanie, but 100's, 1000's of people are seeing that school isn't what it once was.

    • Sarah H.

      Shame I can't post a picture from an article about half of school staff have said children in their school / class have self harmed due to the pressure they are put under and this is in primary schools. The article was on sky news with the heading 'stress driving primary kids to self harm'

      Is that what you call getting out in one piece?

    • Melanie T.

      at yet millions send their children to school, and millions of children excel there and go on to have amazing careers and lives. when was the last time you met a homeschooled doctor or lawyer or pilot? when does homeschooling end? if you want a want a degree you have to go a formal educational facility. the ou doesn't do everything. and guess what there are bad lecturers at uni, bullies at uni, bad experiences at uni, bad courses, you can't control their education forever

    • Sarah H.

      I am not saying home schooling is for every family but it is for mine and I think this is a huge problem in society, that people cannot see that everyone has different views and opinions and to respect them.

    • guest

      Melanie T you are totally missing my point and I am not prepared to carry it on. You think school is the best for your child and I think home education is the best for mine. School conditions children to think the same, hence why I don't want my son there!

    • guest

      Sarah H again this isn't the majority, it's something sociologist call moral panic, a newspaper prints an article and suddenly every school in the country is riddled with self harming children. there have always been and will always be self harmers, some are even homeschooled, it's a psychological condition. just because one person self harms in a situation doesn't mean everyone will, in fact some will thrive in that situation, the world is not the same for everyone, whether you home school or not

    • guest

      Melanie T if parents want to take that risk, that is their choice but we are all entitled to our opinions, aren't we?!

    • Melanie T.

      I do respect you views but I just want to know at what point to you stop controlling your child's education you cannot give your child a degree no more than I can.

  • Emma W.

    Is there anybody on here who could help with advice for the parents who are thinking about it? I would be very interested to see how it works x

    • Amy R.

      Yes me too!

    • Louise R.

      There is a home education UK fb group for people considering it or doing it lots of info on there

    • Alison D.

      We can help not a problem

    • Nadine M.

      It works how u want it to, theres no curriculum to follow, u learn through play and days out, there are groups who arrange days out doing particular learning aspects, socialising and special groups for gcses, in hampshire there is alot on x

    • guest

      You work it however you want to, nothing to prove to anyone, no curriculum to follow. Just get out and about (or not!) do whatever you like :) Some people have sit down learning some people don't. I tend to think they learn from life anyway, life skills much more important.

    • Tessa F.

      Send a letter to the head to deregister and wat date(templates on google for letter) the head will contact LEA(local education authority ) who will contact u to arrange visit which u can decline and email or write back. Most people deschool (get school outta ur system) then enjoy the ride. Message me for more info and helpful websites x

    • Debbie H.

      Is there groups in Dorset ?

    • Louise R.

      I think there is Debbie if you search fb and Google you should find them

  • Victoria S.

    Nope as a teacher for me the social aspect of school is just as important as what you learn

    • Nadine M.

      Home ed groups these days are very social, they meet regulary at parks, fitness groups, play places, regular day education groups, its not literally home education

    • Victoria S.

      Is this America though???? I'm UK

    • Louise R.

      No UK

    • Victoria S.

      Really where? I would home ed if I thought I could offer a full package

    • Chris S.

      The "social" argument always makes me laugh. There are so many home educating families around and so many wonderful opportunities to get together, that yes, socialising is a real problem....we have a problem fitting it all in!

    • Victoria S.

      I meant where are you based ?? I am NW and struggle to find baby and toddler groups at present

    • Layla R.

      Our biggest issue with home ed is choosing which of the things on offer to do and which we have to leave, as there aren't enough hours in the day! Facebook groups seem to be pretty invaluable for making connections with other home educators and opportunities in the area. I'm an ex teacher, disillusioned with the system, so it was a no brainer for me.

    • Victoria S.

      Where are you based ????? Keep asking and nobody is saying?

    • Louise R.

      Well all over I guess am in Cumbria

    • Victoria S.

      Louise I am not attempting to be narky I am genuinely interested - so "I guess" to me means wind your neck in its just a question and stop being defensive !!!! I am based Rossendale and as previously mentioned struggle to find a decent baby group let alone home educate ! Goodness me I though this would be a helpful feed!

    • Louise R.

      Am not being narky I can't speak for everyone am in Cumbria if you goggle or search Facebook you will probably find a local or near by group

    • Layla R.

      Try this one: https://www.facebook.com/groups/260742147332798/ No need to be grumpy :D .

    • Victoria S.

      I have there was nothing I have two children and lived in a different area with first - there was loads to do - where I am now is extremely limited

    • Louise R.

      I think Lancashire had a yahoo group

    • Louise R.

      Has

    • Layla R.

      That's a shame :( Were you seriously considering it before? My friend is a member of that group, I could ask her what else is happening if you're no longer a member.

    • Layla R.

      Also, there was a post on one of the national HE groups saying that there's a vibrant HE community in Lancashire. Maybe I have the wrong Rossendale in mind.

    • Victoria S.

      Yes I would seriously consider it but am genuinely struggling - there are toddler groups but very much play based nothing with any content ie singing/ arts /story

    • Victoria S.

      I'll have another mooch

    • Layla R.

      I'd start by joining the Lancashire group I linked to and see what experienced folk are up to. Toddler groups are a whole different area, and won't be catching most of the HE folk. My youngest who is 4 in May just tags along at the HE groups we go to. There are always other younger siblings to be with.

    • Victoria S.

      This is the kind of info I need - it needs to be more widely published where and what you can do. I've tried joining Lancashire still waiting - I teach secondary

    • Layla R.

      Hopefully they won't keep you waiting much longer. Apparently Lancashire LA are good with home educators (not all counties are!) - this is their HE page: http://www.lancashire.gov.uk/children-education-families/educating-your-child-at-home.aspx

    • Chris S.

      Victoria, we are in Lincolnshire but close to Cambridgeshire and Norfolk. There are loads of families and lots of activities and get-togethers. We are spoiled for choice :-) I have friends in Lancashire and they have a thriving HE community and a lovely LA who are very supportive of home education.

    • guest

      Chris S thanks it's nice to hear positive comments - it's a real issue and difficult decision I will face M- we get school places tomorrow and if we are unsuccessful with our first choice this is the avenue we would look to take

    • Chris S.

      My daughter is 12 and she has never been to school. I am sure she would have been OK in school, but after putting our three older children through the system, we knew there had to be a better way. And, for us, it has been so much better. The decision to HE is only difficult before you make it! Once you make that decision and connect with other families it is not so daunting, and it's a real eye-opener. There's a whole world of home educators out there, and the kids are fabulous. Not the awkward, social recluses the media(and ignorant folk) would have you believe. We have met some wonderful families and made amazing friends over the years. Try it. If it doesn't work out you can always try school. I have never met a home educator who has regretted the decision to HE, but I have lost count of the folk who wished they'd done it earlier.

    • Melanie T.

      I've a lot of home school kids who just wanted to go to school though

    • Louise R.

      And how many school children hate school to the point of depression and just want to go home its not for people to judge do what is right for the child

  • Colette L.

    I wouldn't as I think school teaches children so much more than academic lessons. Such as how to mix with people from different backgrounds. The discipline to get into a routine outside the home. Plus when do you stop?? Primary, secondary, university. I just think that one day they need to take steps in the big wide world on their own. Just my opinion xx

  • Carol H.

    If I didn't have to work I would home school mine but it's not possible with a mortgage to pay.

  • Cheryl L.

    If I could home sch my daughter who is 15 I would shes having major probs at sch but we would end up fighting all the time lol!

  • Lydia D.

    I'm considering it for my 3 &1 yr old. I've joined fb page to try and see how realistic it would be. I don't think I want a head teacher telling me what I can or can't do with my own child. I don't want to have to deal with stroppy teachers.

  • Rachel L.

    we had this convo a couple of weeks ago x

  • Jo P.

    I do it with my autistic 15 year old, harder than I thought to be honest but the school let him down badly and he suffered a bad head injury so I had no choice! I've ADHD myself so am finding it very hard, I know people who do it and find it easy, you don't have to follow the curriculum either X

  • Alison D.

    I home educate my 10yo son & ive never seen him happier! All the negative comments about socialising is just laughable to be honest! If anyone wants any advice just ask!

    • Louise R.

      Well said

    • Alison D.

      Thank you! I can't believe what I'm reading to be honest! We all have our own opinions but people need to research things before they comment

    • Nadine M.

      People literally believe home education means u are in the home for school hours! it couldnt be any more different!

    • Alison D.

      Exactly lol these people with negative comments know nothing about HE! I've been on both sides but I would never criticise anyone for sending there child to school it's just wasn't for my son!

    • Nadine M.

      Same here! Home ed opened up my eyes to an amazing little "free" world i never knew existed!

    • Alison D.

      I'm so annoyed right now

    • guest

      I luff you Alison D! Love it when people talk sense.

    • Alison D.

      Aww thank you it's not often I do talk sense lol

  • Alison D.

    Omg I'm just cringing at certain comments! Home Education is not a prison, we do t hold our children hostage

  • Emma N.

    I home educate my 3 three children and they socialise just fine :-)

  • Patsy P.

    I do home educate my 6 year old we have done a few years now we love it and my youngest will be home educated too come in September next year..it's not all about socialisation as it's the same in schools u only socialise when it's break ...my sons going football soon so he will socialise with other children so I'm not worried :) we also meet up with other home educated family's. And we are happy doing what we do its freedom he does work at his own pace and least we know he's not bullied I don't need to worry if he's bullied or going to harm himself like most and anyone who thinks otherwise we'll tough crap obviously you don't know nothing about home education enough said :) were happy my sons are happy :) x

    • Nicola R.

      Hi Patsy. Are you in the UK? I would like to home educate my daughter but don't know where to start.....

    • Patsy P.

      Hi nichola yes I'm in the UK x

    • Sinéad M.

      Nicola there are few groups on Facebook that will be helpful to you. If you just search for; Home education UK Home schooling early years Home Schooling UK.

  • Emma N.

    I think what annoys me the most is people think it's ok to criticise my choice of home educating my children but I don't criticise their choice to choosing school for their children. People are far to quick to judge and criticise.

    • Louise R.

      Exactly

    • Alison D.

      Well said

    • Lynn R.

      Yes! Complete strangers who think it's OK to grill you for information about their 'socialisation' and to make my child feel awkward for not being in school.

    • Danielle C.

      I'd love to home educate but being a single parent the government just don't allow it you have to be able to work

    • Emma N.

      Hundreds of single parents home educate and are self employed

    • Ruth B.

      Hear hear Emma. It reminds me of people at football matches shouting at the players telling them how to play when they have never played professional football themselves. Everyone seems to be an expert on everybody else's life. What a funny old world we live in :confused:

  • Sam N.

    I would love to. There are so many home education communities now that socialisation really isn't an issue. Teach them what you want! Unschool them. Show them the world. Listen to them. If I could afford to do it, I would. There really are so, so many people who do it now. If you are thinking about it and can do it, do it! I think it will go from strength to strength over the coming years.

  • Chantelle T.

    I would if I thought I had the patience but I can barely do homework with her without wanting to leave the country :joy: I get so fed up of schools habit of brushing bullying issues under the carpet though, so I have vaguely considered it. Hats off to home schoolers, you're awesome.

    • Kayleigh T.

      Remember she's been at school all day tho which is probably why she doesn't want to do more at home X

    • Chantelle T.

      No she does want to do it lol, it's me who doesn't want to do it! I don't particularly agree with a five year old having homework in the first place, to be honest.

  • Liz M.

    any of this any use to u for ur research

    • Christine B.

      Thanks Liz! I'll have a look now. I've met some wonderful families so far :grinning:

  • guest

    What utter bulls**t every single one of you speak, you sit so high in your towers watching the world go round in you wonderful social groups. You think home educated children lack socialisation skills, because there not in a school, yet in a school they get little time to 'socialise' and are packed into rooms where they get less than 1/30th of the attention they deserve because undoubtedly there's a kid who just cannot sit still and craves the attention of everyone around them.

    You couldn't possibly have a valid opinion on home educating, because your so happy sending your children to a dulled, makeshift cell for 6-7 maybe even 8 hours a day, and you've never stopped to think about a different way. Your happy that your children fall into a routine of an academic pecking order, and that you accept your children 'aren't to good at maths' or 'science isn't their strong point'. Just because one teacher - a person charged with making your kids education an experience to enrich there lives, treat it as just a paycheck - can't vary their learning styles to accommodate them.

    But, hold on, from what I gather from most of the comments, the only reason you don't home educate is because of the social aspect, always with this 'how will they deal with real people'. Funny thing is, they meet a huge variety of people, have a huge group of friends and can't talk to children and adults alike, with amazing confidence.

    Stop assuming that you know how home education works, that we who choose to educate are a bunch of mindless hippies happy to allow our children to doss around doing nothing. Our children are our responsibility, and there education begins when they are born, what on earth makes anyone think a piece of paper saying your a Qualified teacher makes them better in any way to you, your husband or wife, grandparents or even other children?

    • Emma P.

      I wish I could 'love' this comment. Excellent points made!

    • Kayleigh T.

      What shocks me is how parents believe that when their child turns 3 or 5 all of a sudden they aren't good enough to teach them anymore and have to send them to someone else to be taught

    • DM W.

      :clap_tone2::clap_tone2:

    • Helen M.

      It takes a while as a parent to 'de school' let alone the child! As home education has become more commonplace (not surprising) many of us parents went through the 'normal' system. If only it was that simple that this place you are meant to send your kids to catered for every parent and child's needs. It just simply isn't the case! I never set out to home school, it just worked out that way, when I realised that my daughter had a say in her life, and how sick it is that she was that unhappy that she hurt herself in order to get home to us. I remember the growing sense of hatred towards the school system and the wish that it would just damn well work like it does for so many other people. But now my daughter is 8, I have a 2 year old who everyone is now commenting on that she will be starting school part time soon (I don't think so) and a baby on the way. Life is an adventure and I only intend it to get better. We don't have a huge amount of money and she had no decent kids in school worth being friends with! There are other ways now, you don't have to package your kids off to school like a packed lunch. You can just enjoy them, learn as you go, prove nothing to anyone as you don't have to! So easy to critiscise home educators just because your brain is too stuffed full of yourself to accept anything fresh.

    • Kyleigh C.

      I'm yet to meet a teacher who treats the job as a paycheck... most treat is as a sacred vocation and dedicate many many more than their 'paid' hours to trying to help and nurture children in their care. Unfortunately this effort is squashed by an ever tightening governmental grip and impossible hoops to jump through. Teachers don't teach for the money. They mark papers, complete assessments, plan to a ridiculous level of detail, follow untested policies and regimes, and endure huge criticism for the money. They TEACH for the love of the kids.

    • Colette L.

      This isn't a question that is supposed to start an argument. It is asked out of interest. What age do you plan/do you feel able to home school to??

    • guest

      I would love to meet the teachers you have met Kyleigh C, as they would probably make me cry. I must point out that I didn't say every teacher. There will be some teachers that do teach for the love of it, for the spark they see in an engaged mind, as there will be home educators that will do bugger all but get their kids to do chores around the house. Inadvertently, you have made the point I may have failed to make, that teachers lack the TIME to focus on their students due to the precise comments you have made.

    • guest

      Kyleigh C Sacred vocation!? I'm sorry but even the advert for teaching on tv at the moment - the main cumulative point at the end of it is the pay cheque. I live next to a teacher who hates kids and literally does it for the holidays! Sacred vocation my a*s cheeks.

    • Colette L.

      I assume there is something along the lines of Ofsted for Home Ed kids?? As obviously the parent would be failing the child if the kids just do chores or do leisure activities all day. Plus they obviously need to study to at least GCSE level & take the exams I assume?? Just because my opinion is disagreed with does not make it bullish*t xx

    • Emma N.

      There is no ousted and children aren't required to take exams if they don't wish to

    • Emma N.

      *ofsted

    • guest

      Helen M.... it's the government who made that advert. Not teachers. One bad teacher that you know doesn't represent them all. It is a sacred vocation.... whatever your 'ass cheeks' might tell you. I'd stop listening to them. ... :relaxed:

    • Colette L.

      Interesting Emma, how do they apply for jobs without taking exams?? Again just interested in views

    • guest

      Colette L There are many methods these days not just the school route. Many kids get into uni just from experience and things they have learned the home ed way, many of them are better educated than school attenders as they can concentrate on the things that interest them.

    • guest

      Kyleigh C The Government rule the teachers. Basically teaching is reading out of an approved text. There is no individuality, teachers do as they are told.

    • Debbie H.

      Would love to home school but have absolutely no idea where I'd start as I have 4 school aged children all in different years :/ x

    • Lynsey S.

      I have also not had the misfortune of meeting any of these awful money grabbing, paycheck oriented teachers and I have 2 kids in primary school. You make it sound like they are everywhere lol. I'm sure they are the minority not the majority. I think homeschooling or formal schooling both work for some families. Don't bash either. My kids love school and can't wait to get there everyday. They love school holidays too but are usually happy to get back to friends, learning and routine. I am lucky that my children are happy and that the education system for the most part works for them. If they were unhappy I would find another way. Stop being so self-righteous about your decision and don't assume school is a dull place!

    • guest

      Ooooo someone is on the defensive Robert M! If this is the type of parent in up against maybe home schooling isn't for me !!!! I see school as a social environment and do believe most teachers do it out of love of the job. I think you would have to live it with all the extra that comes with it.

      I do hope if your home schooling your children have a broader mind than yourself though - we can't push our views and opinions onto our children they must learn grow and form their won !

    • guest

      Lynsey S what a wonderful comment :heart_eyes:

    • guest

      Helen M, I am a teacher. I am also a parent of two, nearly three children. I don't read from an approved text . I agree that the government are trying to control teachers but can also guarantee teachers have children's best interests at heart and strive to do what's right by them at every turn, often under great criticism and pressure. :relaxed: saying this I too am considering home schooling. Not because I think teaches are money grabbing prison keepers but because I feel that the uphill climb they have to do in order to stay true to their ideas on education is getting too steep for even some of the best teachers to climb successfully .

    • guest

      Victoria S Defensive yes, it's tiresome being told you are doing the wrong thing all the time. If you cannot see the point of home schooling and are stuck in the school frame of mind then yes maybe home schooling isn't for you! Just leave the responsibility to someone else and please yourself.

    • guest

      Kyleigh C My heart bleeds. You cannot talk for EVERY teacher, you just cannot! It is the minority who care!

    • Helen M.

      I'm a mother of nearly three children too, I truly teach for the love of it, because I don't get paid, I don't get holidays and I won't allow my children to be failed.

    • Colette L.

      I agree with Victoria, you can have a discussion without being defensive & insults!! Maybe the school my son goes to is in the minority but he loves it & all the teachers are dedicated, hard working & caring!! The education system doesn't fail every child

    • Melanie T.

      my child loves school, her school is an amazing stimulating place where they offer her so many learning styles, opportunities and activities that I couldn't possibly compete with. out of interest how do you plan on taking your children through a levels? I know I don't know no where near enough about a subject to be able to teach to an a level standard, just wondered if you do!

    • guest

      Emma N so when an employer says that you need a C or above in English, maths and science how does a home schooled kid do this if they don't have to take exams?

    • guest

      Helen M how old are your children?

    • Natalie P.

      Quite worrying though when original poster can't use the correct form of there or your. That would look great on a CV in years to come!! I have no views on home education so was interested to her people's opinions but bad spelling is not acceptable

    • guest

      Natalie P seriously?! In the grand scheme of things that's what you're worrying about? Wow...

    • guest

      Melanie T it's about choice and living life for life not exams. There are plenty of alternatives and choices for all children irrelevant of whether they are in school or not. They often attend college from about 14-16yrs. Some children start sitting their GCSEs early, they might take them slowly over a few years. From my experience they usually attend college for Alevels but statistically HE children are more likely to be entrepreneurs and their own bosses. X

    • Daisy G.

      It's brilliant that your children excel in school. We're all so different right? It's great we have the choice to follow through with what we each know is best for our children :slight_smile:

    • Melanie T.

      what I object to is the poster and who I assume is the posters wife slagging off the school system, when it works for a huge number of children

    • guest

      You should really learn the differences between there, their and they're. Your and you're, before you consider home schooling :joy::joy::joy::joy:

    • Sheena V.

      Wow it seems that Robert is the only one whose opinion is right here. If you home school your children, I hope you do not teach them this. A lot of people on this thread seem to be in the minority which you & your ?wife or sister speak about as they are praising the dedication of teachers. Robert, may I ask has your decision to home school came from fear because of your own experiences at school? I am a very each to their own type of person but genuinely don't understand how children do exams etc if being home schooled? One person saying exam results don't matter on cv's - unfortunately that's not true. I'm also very curious to know how people can work & earn a living if at home, home schooling? Especially a single parent? These are genuine queries before anyone jumps on me.

    • Colette L.

      Those of you who home school (just a question out of interest) do you worry that when your children reach an age when you can no longer teach them & go to college/university or work that you will find it hard to let them "break free" & step into the world without you?? A genuine question xx

    • Liz E.

      My 3 children are very happy at school. One of my children has problems making friends and has no concentration, if I was to home school him I don't believe it would do him any favours. But all children are different and what's good for some isn't good for others xx

    • guest

      Colette L do you think home ed parents keep children hostage & that they don't engage with the outside world?

    • Andrina H.

      I home ed and I have also had my children in school. I can see benefits both ways and agree that we should all be more supportive and accepting of everyone's choices as we all afterall just want to do the best for our children. To answer the questions re exams jobs etc, my 18 yr old daughter never did GCSEs but at 16 started an apprenticeship in hospitality & catering. She has now just finished and is NVQ 3 qualified in it and also sous chef and silver service waitressing. The work placement loves her so much they've shifted things to be able to offer her part time work and she's going to look for other work too. She already has had offers to work at a place she did some work experience in. And she also went for a job interview last week and was offered the job on the spot.

    • guest

      Colette L not at all. The point of home schooling for my family is to equip them to deal with the 'real' world by never leaving it. The whole time they are being home ed they are mixing with all sorts of people and finding their way in the world themselves so that they will be more confident and well rounded individuals. It's not about not wanting to 'let go' as such. But I can only speak for me and my family. I respect the school system for what it should be. I'm a trained teacher but decided teaching wasn't for me. I know a great deal of amazing teachers who try their very hardest for their children in their class. I'm saddened by the direction the school system is going. Teaching to exam and constant testing :disappointed: x

    • Emma N.

      Someone asked the question about ofsted and taking exams and I answered with what the law actually is. As regards to how the child will get a job, well thats the child's choice, if they want to go into a career where they need gcses and qualifications then there are many ways to get them, it's easy to take gcses if you are home educated. Many children stagger them and start taking them at age 14, as there is no pressure to take so many at one time.

    • Ruth B.

      School is wonderful for some children and for some it is wrong whether that be because it fails to stretch them academically, does not meet their complex needs or they are bullied. Some children struggle to learn via the standard school system of teaching. Some children thrive within schools and achieve wonderful things, others leave the school system barely literate. Every child and indeed every adult is an individual. Just as not everybody will be able to play a musical instrument or paint a masterpiece, not everybody will be good at maths for example. Different strokes for different folks. What is important though is that every child is nurtured. Every child is educated to the 'age, ability and aptitude' (the legal requirement) and where that education takes place is irrelevant. What works for my child may not work for yours and that is fine because my childs education is my legal responsibility just as your child's is yours. Live and let live folks.

    • guest

      Helen M in a full time secondary teacher - so others also leave it to me - with your closed mind I hope you can offer a rounded education ! How very rude of you

    • guest

      Sheena V exams can still be taken. I know some single parents manage by working from home, but it is a lot of commitment. HE I have found is just not one solid path of education, some parents don't follow the curriculum, some do. Have a google it is a really interesting read and a complete different world. I am currently HE my 6 year old son, but I have another teenage son that has sailed through school is in line for good GCSE results, and has enjoyed school. I honestly never thought I would HE but here I am! & enjoying it :-)

    • Victoria B.

      Most teachers however know when to use you're and your in the correct way and at least have others to criticise them when wrong.

    • guest

      Colette L there is more to life than exams..colleges look at the child as a whole not just their ability to remember 'stuff' for a period of time to please the government!! It's not about disagreeing with your opinion it's about telling you to shut the hell up when you clearly know NOTHING about the subject!!!

    • guest

      Natalie P hear!!

    • Gabby E.

      This is exactly what I've been trying to explain to everyone jumping down my throat when I say I want to home school my daughter!

  • Alison D.

    If schools weren't run on attendance reports & sats results & maybe if they took the needs of children into account HE wouldn't be as popular as it is now! Please research before you post negative comments on Home Education!

  • Nadine M.

    Why do people have such opinions like children can only be socialised at school? Home education doesnt mean u literally stay at home! there are an abundance of home ed groups in the areas, they meet for educational subjects, ice skating, laser tag, climbing groups, gcse groups meet and are taught for things that are tricky, educational days out and fun days out, there are many groups that meet daily in others houses and learn things together, there is so many aspects to home learning and freedom to let your children grow in what is most interesting to them, that is how children excel by being able to be themselves... my child is at school but i wish it was more affordable to have her home.. her report states her downside is she is quiet and needs to speak up more.. why? Why does that define how she learns or who she is? Why does it matter, shes 5.. its little things like this, if u can home ed do it, u will feel free and happy!

    • Emmi W.

      I would love to home school to but sounds like we're in the same situation financially. I was very quiet in school and all the teachers pointed it out at parents evening like it was a bad thing (when really I just thought the kids I'm my class weren't worth it as they were very bitchy and bullied me alot) so I had no one really to talk to. Kids can be so evil and that's one of the reason I hated school (as well as the teachers using me as punishment for the attention craving idiots) and I skipped it alot pretending to be ill. Plus I think what they teach in schools is complete nonsense that barely relates to adult life. We will be anyway but I think teaching kids about money and how interest and tax work is going to be beneficial to them. I'm 22 and everything it comes to sorting it out I haven't a clue where I stand. Also I feel that showing then how to cook and grow their own foods (which I'm gonna start doing with my 3 year old soon) will help them so much. Also I'd love to take them on more school trips too. I do think being in a class for that long (and they're planning on making school days longer too) is not fair on their health. You hear all the time that children are becoming more stressed and depressed because of this.

  • Wendy K.

    I'm not sure theres a right and wrong here? Just parents who are all on the whole trying to do what they truly believe is best for their child/children surely the pure fact that we are so worried and putting their needs first is what is fundamentally helping them to flourish in either environment?! Lets also not forget these 'children' are all individual souls very different from one another some would probably flourish a bit more at home others at school . x

  • Patsy P.

    Can I just mention my son is clever for his age he even knows algebra and tbh I'm gonna be truthful I never could do algebra it's not easy so for a 6 year old that's fantastic..and for a child to come out with he wants to learn about who made humans and so on is wow as at his age most are just bothered about playing or doing 1+1 maths ! Just because they don't go to school it doesn't mean they won't/ can't socialise cuz it's utter bollox ...I hate the fact home educated children / parants gets judged by not sending them to school but we don't say "don't send your child/ children to school because they don't help or give a crap when there getting bullied" so its visa versa :) people are so eager to judge home educated but doesn't actually know anything about it ...

  • Leanne M.

    Simply no. My child needs to adapt to social situations and learn to make friends. She needs to be on par with her peers and experience the "norm". I'm also not a teacher, I don't know the best way to explain a complicated maths equation or any other question. I know how to answer them of course, but I simply cannot give my child the education that I received at school. Teachers are trained, they generally know their stuff and there are a few exceptions but if you take enough interest then you know where and when to take a stand. When I look back at my own education I don't see what I did or didn't learn, I see the friends I made along the way. You may not be isolating your children, but you are choosing who and what they come in contact with and therefore learn. FYI - my daughter is in a class of only 12. In case that makes a difference to the cynics

    • Ruth B.

      I helped out with reading in my 6yo daughters class. During a role play lesson where the teacher who was also the school deputy head, was Florence Nightingale my daughter asked a question the teacher did not know the answer too (What was used for anaesthetic?) and I had to whisper the answer to the teacher. On another occasion the teacher told the children that there are 8 planets and one dwarf planet in our solar system. My daughter corrected her and named the other two dwarf planets and was told to hush as she was wrong. My daughter took in her Lucy & Steven Hawking book the following day to show her teacher that what she had said was correct. This is part of the reason we chose to pull her from school to home educate.

    • Tricia F.

      Peers?

      There is no other place, anywhere, ever, where you'll find such a large group of people of the same age. Nowhere.

      Society, and workplaces, are made up of people of different ages, needs, capabilities, and interests. School robs them of the appreciation of those differences and opportunities to interact with people very different to themselves

      And don't get me started on the dynamic and risks of a child growing up in an environment where they do not have permission to say 'No, I won't'

    • Leanne M.

      Seems to me that the problem is isolated to the particular schools you know. My child's teachers are never likely to not know how many planets there are in the solar system, or whatever other education was lacking. I would love to hear how school robs children of the chance to appreciate differences in society but I really don't have time for you to make up an answer. The simple fact is that you ate talking nonsense. In my daughters class there are rich kids, poor kids, fat kids, thin kids, clever kids, not so clever kids, multi race children and every single one of them a different person inside. My child is never scared to say no I won't - why would she be? What you talk is utter nonsense, and I look forward to seeing the results of our views in 20 years time. Education isn't just what you learn in a classroom after all - perhaps a break from a know it all mum would give children the opportunity to realise that there is a whole world of education out there, not just what they are told to believe. You are entitled to your opinion, as am I, but do not reply to my words with complete lies or I will be forced to defend myself. You have a poor opinion of your education system, so do I. That's why I paid to go private.

    • Sarah H.

      No Leanne. By you sending your daughter to school you / the teachers are choosing what she learns and who she comes into contact with. My son has the choice of what he wants to learn about and unlike in a school he will make his own choices because he can. He's 3 at the moment but I cannot wait for us to learn together

    • Melanie T.

      so if you son never wanted to learn maths you wouldn't make him? you are just controlling his world not educating him, I love the fact that the school have visitors from police, to fire brigade, to a boxer and a scientist, they have so many positive influences on the children. I like the fact that that my child meets people that I might not have ever introduced her to and children from all walks of life. I love that the school encourage the other children in others years to all work together.

    • Leanne M.

      Choosing who she comes into contact with? The other children in the class are not selected, hand picked or anything... Honestly your arguments are so feeble. She comes into contact with a wide variety of children from all walks of life, and then in the evenings and weekends is free to learn the things she chooses and come into contact with the big wide world. My daughter makes her own choices too, and she learns a broad range of subjects, doesn't pick and choose because, trust me - a child should not be in control of their own education. They don't understand what will be needed as an adult, what they will need to know to live, how to further read up on what makes them curious. These are the skills being taught to them at school, and you are not going to convince me that school is comparable to a concentration camp. Children learn skills that they will need in later life, by isolating your own child you are setting him up to struggle to adapt to social situations and by letting him choose what he learns you are causing him to have a fixed range of knowledge and, inevitably, become spoilt. Complete nonsense. Anyway, come back to me when you actually have a child of school age and then give your opinion. You are not in a position now to see the full picture. I wonder do you let your 3 year old dictate the dinner menu and bed times also?

    • Ruth B.

      By very definition of your child being in paid private education the school peer group will be selective. No children whose parents are on benefits or low waged jobs will be sitting in her classroom for example. Unlikely that a child with complex special needs will be working alongside her. As for range and of subjects, I have no doubt she does, but that range is limited by what is available within her school. What if she wants to learn Mandarin or Urdu and that is not available? Given the rise of the Chinese and Indian economies, those are very sensible options. Choosing to send a child to a private school is not so different to choosing home education. Private school -smaller classes. Home ed - 1 - 1 Private school - broader subject choices Home ed - choice to study any subject Private school - not restricted by national curriculum Home ed - not restricted by national curriculum Private schools - no restrictions on holiday times Home ed - freedom to travel

      As for a child needing to be taught how to research areas of interest, my child chose to educate herself about space. She chose a library book when I took her to the library, not her state school, but me. She then chose to research via Google (with my supervision) to find out more. She chose to not only read a book by Lucy & Steven Hawking, she then decided to find out more about Dr Hawking and his life. All this she decided to do at 6 years old, when she was in school as it happens. A state school, that is struggling financially, had 3 children with complex special needs in her class, had children still struggling to read and although she was identified as gifted and talented by teachers there was not enough cash in the teaching budget to do anything about that. A state school where they were busy teaching classmates to read whilst my daughter was sitting bored. This is the reality of state schooling. This is the reality for the vast majority of parents and children in the UK. Now, I have 4 adult children that have been through the state education system and two school age children, one of whom has such complex needs it is unlikely that there will be a school, special or mainstream that can accommodate him. I also have experience of the private school system so I would suggest that I have a broader perspective than many. From the moment a child is born a parent teaches them. The parents role is vital. If a child has encouragement and support at home they are more likely to learn. As I posted elsewhere, education for all only became widely available in Victorian times. Until then only those who could afford it were educated. My educational choices for my child do not impact you just as yours do not impact me, so why does it matter?

    • Leanne M.

      I'm not in the UK - but you are wrong about a paid private school having a selective peer group. There are assisted places, and bursaries available for low income families. I know this is the same in the UK as I was educated in a private school in the UK on a bursary myself. There were many struggling parents sending their children to my school, and there are at my daughter's. I'm hardly rich myself, but I make sacrifices for her sake because if you saw the state schools here you would realise I actually have no choice, and the UK education system actually has a lot going for it. Your daughter furthered her knowledge herself, as do I and as does my daughter. Natural curiosity will do that. I have no issues with the fact that she isn't doing this at school - it is nice to have projects to do together and I know that in reality school can't possibly cover every subject possible. As for the curriculum, there has to be a cut off somewhere - and how could you as a mother possibly teach a language you do not speak? If my child wants to learn another language (entirely possible since she speaks 3 already) then she can join an after school class and do it in her own time. School is not the start and end of education, children are constantly learning. I have no issues with others home educating their children, everyone is free to make their own choices. I stated that it wasn't for me and gave my reasons why. People are so quick to judge though, the replies seemed to suggest I was damaging my child in some way by sending her to school and that is simply not true. Health wise a school educated child will come into contact and build a better immunity to diseases, socially they will learn to adapt to new situations much quicker and educationally they will not suffer, learning core subjects and being able to learn other things outside of school out of choice. You are free to educate your children as you wish, but they will have to take the same core subject exams as my child at the end of the day in order to go to university or be employed - and I choose to have a professional, who knows the syllabuses teach this to my child instead of winging it myself, or relying on the internet to teach it. Certainly not something to call social services over... And you should probably look into your opinions of private schools - it is not only possible to have a child whose parents are on benefits in the class - but relatively common.

    • Ruth B.

      As it happens, you have hit on exactly something we are doing. My daughter is learning Hindi with a friend of mine who has Hindi as a first language and I attend a BSL group alongside my daughter and deaf friends. Neither of these are available within schools in our area and whilst there are BSL classes available locally they are at further education colleges which are not accessible to school age children.That is how you can facilitate your child learning something you do not have the knowledge to teach. As for needing exams to be employed or attend university, a close friend actually teaches a course at a university despite having never passed GCSE's. He himself was accepted into university as an adult student via personal statement and experience. He now has a PHD. My sister who failed O'levels has two degrees. My son who failed maths GCSE despite attending state school and resitting it three times has worked since age 13. There are many routes to succeeding in adult life, not all are academic :grinning: School works for some children and that is fantastic. Home education works for some children and that is fantastic too. Some of us choose a combination of both for our children as we tailor it to each individual child so have experience of both ways. You make the choice to send your child to a private school and that is obviously the right choice for her. Great, I am happy that your child is receiving the right education for her. I feel that my daughter receives the right education for her too. The point is that home education, state education, private education, all have their merits. What is important is that each individual child gets the education that is right for them and that we as parents have the right to make that choice. It is not anyones place to criticise your choice to privately educate your child just as it is not anyones place to criticise my choice to home educate mine or criticise my neighbours for sending her child to state school. As you rightly point out, my knowledge of private education is limited. I would respectfully suggest that your knowledge of home education is similarly limited. We are fortunate enough to be able to make choices as many in the world do not have that opportunity. Maybe we should accept each others choices without criticism.

  • Claire P.

    I'm considering it my daughter is in high school now and being bullied adhd and ginger hair means she's a target for horrible children. When she told the teacher, the teacher shouted at her yesterday saying she hasn't got the time or the energy to sort out my daughters problem. My daughter is achiving well academically, is rarely in trouble and until recently loved the routine and structure of school. the only problem she faces are bullies but the school are more concerned with ofsted inspections, sats scores and gcse results to be concerned with the welfare and happiness of my "problem" child. I'll be at school hammering on the desk again on Monday morning after phone calls and letters and 2 days off this week have failed. Home school sounds like the perfect solution.

    • Marianne B.

      Sounds like time to move on!

  • Claire G.

    Tempting if I had the patience, energy and enthusiasm. Jack literally asks to be home schooled every Monday morning! I struggled to work out how to do his maths homework this week so I'm possibly not the best person to teach him! X

  • Dave D.

    To what syllabus To what standard To what end To what social skill

    • Helen M.

      Such questions, so amaze,

    • Helen M.

      So Duncan.

    • Ruth B.

      You do not have to follow a syllabus There is one young man I know who has done GCSEs, A levels and now an OU degree all whilst home ed. There is no restrictions about what qualifications or academic standard can be reached. For them to be the best person they can be To be able to socialise with whoever they like without restrictions of being born within the same 12 month period.

      Hope that answers your points.

    • Dave D.

      1. I don't see how missing out on socialising with peers can be good for cognitive development. 2.One person does not constitute a reason to rethink our educational system, it's anecdotal evidence at best. 3. Home education seems to be favoured by a select group of people who want to indoctrinate their children in their narrow view of the world. It's seldom education. It perpetuates ignorance. 4. If the parent is uneducated then there is little hope for the child to be educated. That's why teachers have qualifications

    • Louise R.

      Lol Dave look at the research done in America and the UK at least do some research before making such comments

    • Dave D.

      Cite your sources please

      A lot of research happens in these countries

    • guest

      Dave D Forced socialisation isn't healthy socialisation! School is torture for some children, especially teenage girls! My teen is now happy with lovely friends, some home ed some finally educated!! Best decision I've ever made!!!!

  • Mandy M.

    If I was educated enough and able to then yes I would home teach

    • Ruth B.

      You are educated enough. If you can read and write, use a library and Google then you can get as much information as you need. Workbooks, even to GCSE level are readily available.

    • Mandy M.

      I can't do some of that, that's the problem

  • Kim H.

    Well at least they couldn't get bullied at home!

    • Melanie T.

      no you'd just be saving that joy for clubs or work,

  • Lynsey S.

    How do people manage this? With many families having 2 working parents this just isn't plausible for many families. You are really lucky if you have the chance to try. Good luck to those who do. X

  • Jane C.

    How sad that a lot of people on here are making snap judgements and attacking each other. Wouldn't it be more productive to just enquire about social interaction, learning styles and monitoring? Different doesn't mean wrong. I work tirelessly to home educate my children as I'm sure most teachers work tirelessly to educate their class. Us and them attitudes get people nowhere. It would be so much nicer to just learn from each other and respect others choices ✌

  • Leanne M.

    Yes I would!

  • Shishu26

    I want to. My daughter is 3 she will start nursery in septimber. I need more information on how to go about doing this. 

  • Shireen H.

    I probably will.

  • Dee M.

    My kiddies love Home Ed cos they have the freedom of no stress, targets to meet, no bullying, having to rush the work cos the teachers has to meet assignments or cos the term has finished so you move onto the next subjects which can cause stress for those kiddies who are abit behind...my daughter went to school first private nursery then onto main stream where she spent 3yrs getting bullied by the same group of boys..went into yr2 and the teacher wasnt exactly helpful my daughter's learning and left her at the back of the classroom, my son spent 3mths in nursery where he spent more time ill due to SAD (Separation Anxiety Disorder) and the teachers was not interested in helping my son to get through this, so Home Ed it was and its the best thing we have ever done, both kiddies have great social lives, if they aint in Home Ed groups then they are out with friends from their school classes as they have contact with them..best thing about Home Ed is that our kiddies will learn what they need to learn and still go on and make something of themselves cos we have kept their learning interesting, exciting and knowing that they will face adult life without the child stresses, depression and strains..they will face work like any other adult but they will be wanting to jump at the chance of progressing further cos they will be intrigued and on the ball...both of my kiddies are bright in their own ways, both have targets of what they already want to do in life and like any other parent we are pushing them in the right direction but you see our direction will have them to achieve better cos we can offer the subjects, hands on or tours around the area of workplaces they want to do..

    • Melanie T.

      no stress no targets? how are you going to teach how to survive in a modern workplace?

    • Louise R.

      You should do some research and see the wonderful thing home Ed children go on to do also the independent studies done in the UK and American show that home Ed children are more likely to reach the top of there professions you should look them up

    • Melanie T.

      of course no school educated child ever does wonderful things because they are all too busy getting bullied! every single home school person I've ever met hasn't done any different to a school educated person, other than the fact they all wanted to go school!

    • Dee M.

      Only home ed parents will understand why our decision was made, only us knows that we have made the right decision for our children's sake..I dont have time to be petty with other members of the public who 1) I don't know and 2) I don't have to explain my life nor kiddies lives with strangers cos they don't understand the concept of HE..read more and learn more

  • Kerry D.

    I removed my son from school in February. Best decision I ever made for us, I appreciate it won't suit every parent/child. As for the social aspect, well this weekend we are staying in for a break! We have had 3 days of 'socialising' with other home ed families & other friends. Our days are full of fun & learning. We use anything & everything as a learning opportunity. :-)

  • Ruth B.

    What we need to remember is that legally it is a parents responsibility to ensure a child receives an education suited to their age, aptitude and ability as per the Education act. By legal definition, home education is the default choice and schools are an opt in service. Until the late 1800's there were no free schools at all. Only those who could afford to pay were able to send children to school. Since then the availability of free education has become more accessible and the ages that children are entitled to that education has increased. Many of our parents or grandparents would have left schooling at 14 for instance. As schools have become more available, more parents have chosen this as the educational route for their children, whether that be state school or private school. Given the current problems with shortages of school places, those that home educate are actually doing those that send children to school and the government a huge favour. I recently read an article saying that there are over 30,000 known children (records kept by local authorities) being home educated in the UK and there are estimated to be many more who have never attended school so are not included in LA statistics. If all of those children required school places the education budget would rise considerably (especially for SEN children as many home ed children are SEN) and lack of school places would be even higher. Now think about it, what effect does it have on you and your children if Mrs Bloggs down the street home educates her children? Does if matter if Mrs Jones next door sends her children to school? How does another family choosing a different path impact on your life? How about we all just live and let live? Accept that parents make the choice they feel is right for their child and that may not be the same choice you make for yours. After all, isn't tolerance what we should ALL be teaching our children?

    • Andrina H.

      Fantastic post!! :thumbsup_tone1::clap_tone1:

  • Nicola R.

    I want to home school my wee one. Partner wants her in school till 11 but I've said there's no way she's going to secondary.

    • Emma P.

      would you let her choose at that stage then ?

    • guest

      Emma P if she really wanted to go then yes.

  • Jason K.

    Im pro HE! Im a proud father of two teenagers. One Home Schooled, One in Mainstream. I have nothing bad to say, its the parents choice what they choose, but for us home schooling one of our children was the best outcome as school just was not working. Mainstream school suited our other child so they continued but we knew the signs if things were not right. If I had any concerns about it then de-regging was a perfectly legal way to address them. Soon mainstream or otherwise will be finished as one teenager is already in an apprentiship and the other is in the final months of secondary going onto further education via college. The socialising argument is getting tiring now! Kids can socialise in all sorts of ways and school is not the only place.

  • Melanie T.

    I don't care if you home school your kids or not, just don't tar all schools with the same brush. I went to an amazing primary school and an amazing secondary school, I felt important at both schools and I flourished my daughter goes to a great primary school and is thriving. school isn't perfect, but neither is home schooling, yes there are bullies at school, but there are bullies in life in general. you can't hide your child from bullies because if they haven't met them at school they will meet them somewhere. not all schools are the same just as I'm sure not everyone who home school does it perfectly

    • Sarah H.

      The difference is I don't want to throw my son into the lions den at 4, I would rather help grow his confidence and self esteem so that when he is older he can stand up to bullies. I was bullied from the age of 8, so badly the police were involved with the 20 children that were involved. This isn't something I want for my son because it happens all the time. It isn't about tarring all schools with the same brush, all schools are now being forced a certain way with exams etc. It is just the way schools are going and I for one don't want my currently 3 year old being put under that kind of pressure.

    • Melanie T.

      but you don't know that you son will be bullied, it doesn't happen all the time. that's like saying I'm not going let my son ride a bike because I fell off mine and broke my arm. I'm pretty sure parents who were never bullied have a child that gets bullied so you can never tell. your child at 4 should have enough confidence and self esteem from his upbringing this far to cope in a reception class, it's basically an extension of pre school! my child is in reception now and there isn't any pressure, they treat her like an individual and have built her confidence and self esteem even higher than it was before. she has been lucky that she had an amazing pre school where encouraged her and developed her skills, so she is now confident and has such belief in what she can achieve.

    • guest

      Sarah H I take it your son won't be going to things like beavers? or rugby tots or things like that? there are bullies there too, I got bullied a bit a brownies, but I still send my daughter to rainbows and she loves it.

    • Katie N.

      Well my daughter was bullied and not just by children also by a stuck up teacher who thought she was something. My daughter always put 110% into trying to be great for her teacher just to be put down by her. Her confidence had gone but she's so much happier being HE. It's the best thing I did and she's now two years a head in work so she will be doing her exams earlier.

    • Katie N.

      When it comes to socialising my daughter goes to brownies, dance class and has friends after school so socialising isn't a problem it's easier than people think.

    • Melanie T.

      that sounds like a school issue not an education issue, there are so many schools where this wouldn't have happened. it's nothing to brag about the fact that a child is ready two years early. there were kids in my uni who were there 2 years early and they were not mentally mature enough to do the work or have the discussions because they had no life experience.

  • Jason K.

    Also would like to add we met some very smart and talented parents in the home education groups! Some were very highly educated infact and some even had their own successfull businesses. We met so many different kinds of people and I have to add, they were not hippy dippies as some like to spread all over the shop... Katie Hopkins anybody? I often wonder now this is how people put something down that scares them. The government will end up with 1yr olds (EY's as I call them) into a school based childminder setting and then onwards will be that all the way up to 18 with 6am start to 8pm finish. Yey so exciting and think of all the socialising they will get with the myth of Tax free Childcare lol. No wonder so many people are choosing HE as an option. The government should be making school and education something to celebrate but instead are creating so much stress its unreal. How about the forced Academisation of every single school in the uk. That should worry everyone if nothing else does!

    • Susanne A.

      The "forced Academisation" you speak of does not apply to Scottish schools, so NOT the "every single school in the UK" as you've written! Last I checked Scotland is still (sadly) a part of the U.K.

    • Sinéad M.

      Exactly Jason, we home educate. My husband is a doctor & I'm a historian. We're not chanting Kumbaya around a home made fire ;) we're just doing what's best for our kids in our situation.

  • Sharon A.

    Ex teacher...saw the state of the education system with the start of academies and pulled my kids out of the system. .haven't looked back..you dint need a teaching degree to teach your own children . . The Internet is a wonderful thing...tonnes of Facebook home ed groups and local groups for meet ups and socialisation. ..its easier than people realise and the transformation in the confidence of my children is amazing. Getting ready for GCSE'S with my older one and doing a few at a time rather than pushing 11/12 plus on him with most being redundant and a space filler on the timetable or a way to boost league tables.

  • Melanie T.

    out of interest the parents who home school do you not send you children to pre school?

    • Kerry D.

      My son has done nursery/reception & was in year1 until I removed him. He is 6.

  • Sarah E.

    I home educate my eldest who is 5 and his brother will be joining in September rather than sending him to school. For us it was the best decision I could have made. We have made some wonderful friends this year and so had so many amazing experiences but the most important thing... It is an opportunity to make lasting memories together.

    Will we HE all the way? Who knows... For now though it is working for us.

  • Michala

    Home Education is to us a world where  teaching is 1:1,  children's natural ability to discover and learn are promoted, learning of things that are not relative in life is replaced mostly by the learning of things that will be required in the future and finally a place where social relationships are natural, across generations and aligned with the way it is for most of our lives.  Whereas school is to us an artificial, environment, with constructed learning that has little relation to life and is spoon fed to the pupils who are continually being prepared for exams that measure not intellect but memory skills. Social interactions are forced, child led and tend to be mob ruled with emphasis on clones and bullying of anyone who is differentiated in any minor way. Socialisation is limited to immediate peer groups and the cross over of age groups and generations which allows development and empathy is limited. I have two children in school and one Home Educated child.

  • Andrina H.

    I home ed and I have also had my children in school. I can see benefits both ways and agree that we should all be more supportive and accepting of everyone's choices as we all afterall just want to do the best for our children.

    To answer the questions re exams jobs etc, my 18 yr old daughter never did GCSEs but at 16 started an apprenticeship in hospitality & catering. She has now just finished and is NVQ 3 qualified in it and also sous chef and silver service waitressing. The work placement loves her so much they've shifted things to be able to offer her part time work and she's going to look for other work too. She already has had offers to work at a place she did some work experience in. And she also went for a job interview last week and was offered the job on the spot. Also where she has been working has lots of regulars who love her so much that they bring in gifts of vintage stuff as they know she loves it. One lady has given her an old gramophone with the brass trumpet!

    I still have 15, 12 & 5 yr olds at home and everyone who meets them say what a lovely friendly sociable bunch of kids they are. We regularly meet up with other home ed, friends who are still at school, older people, younger people, family, non family, etc etc etc

  • Katy B.

    No certainly not, they need to learn social skills as well as the academic side of education

    • Kerry D.

      Do you think HE children never leave the house? There is a really big HE community who meet up to do activities. The social side I've realised is noting to worry about.

  • Carley A.

    Would love to HE my son. Just think of all the things we could learn together it would be incredible!

  • Bridge A.

    I really want to home school my daughter. I dont like how schools are ran these days. I want her focused on her interests and in a safe environment. When I was at school I was forced to do lessons I hated and learnt nothing from and we weren't worried about knife crime. Kids take weapons to school these days. Schools have no powers. I want my daughter to enjoy and focus on her education and be safe. Its up to everyone. As long as they have education who cares. You can still implement structure and routine and socialising at home

    • Kerry D.

      So do it :-)

  • Carly P.

    I was just about to tag you in this! Interesting read.

  • Paula B.

    I would love to home school my children but i have a full time job and financially i can't give that up. Well done if you as a family can afford it but not everyone is in the same situation. Some can and want to, some can but dont want to and vice versa. It is what it is. If we all chose to home school there would be a workforce of single/ non parents or older people as everyone else would be at home. School works for some, home schooling for others. Live and let live, no one is right and no one is wrong, just different opinions/ lives.

  • Tracy C.

    I think it's a very old fashion opinion that children can only learn in the classroom, I have 3 children in school, and 1 who is home educated. School is fantastic for some yet awful for others. Luckily we have the choice of both. People who moan about schools but continue to use the services really annoy me, Same as ones who criticise home schooling but continue to send their unhappy kid to school!

  • Yasmin R.

    an interesting read

  • emma76

    My daughter is 2 and goes to nursery part-time which she loves however she will not be going to school. My husband and I have decided we will home educate her as we do not agree with the focus on testing in the current school system and the lack of play based learning and we believe that age 4 is too early to go to school. We have started making links with our local home educating community so that she can make friends with other HE children. I have no doubt it will be a challenge but it feels like the right choice to us.

  • Jacqueline R.

    It's what suits the parents and the children everyone is different, I am a huge advocate of home education , my youngest daughter was home educated for 18months then decided to go back to school when we moved and passed 8 gcse's in ten months and went on to uni. I now help to educate two of my grandsons while 5 of my other grandchildren go to school and thrive really well. Each to their own people should not be pressured into thinking one is right or better.

  • Louise H.

    I personally wouldn't home educate my sons as I don't feel I'd be competent enough & couldn't afford to give up work to do it. But I've got 2 now grown up nieces who were very successfully home educated - they are sociable, intelligent & importantly have their self esteem still intact! Mainstream education is geared towards "one size fits all" & the idea that although we encourage children to be themselves & teach them that everyone is different/diversity is important they are then expected to fit into pigeon holes & reach government set targets to prove their worth in the school community. So whilst it's not for me, I think it is a great option for many children. Why is there a misconception that home educated children are locked in a cupboard never to have any human interaction again?!

  • guest3

    I would like to make a comment I am seriously considering HE my three boys...... I have started as a learning support assistant at their school and I am shocked at how little they do in a day, how some of the children behaved in class.... and how some children are totally ignored. After my very first day I came home and told my husband that they could not continue to be there. So much of the teacher's time was speaking or wait on those disturbing the class to stop talking over the teacher and listen. Those willing to learn were having to wait and before they knew it class was over. I have another 4 weeks in the school if I don't see any major improvements they will not return after the summer holiday's. End off. I have great memories of school but what I saw was not a learning environment, it was not at times a safe environment or a pleasant environment and I personally feel there is no way my child could reach their full potential in that setting.

  • Gabby E.

    I want to, going to wait until my daughters the right age and involve her in the decision. My partner doesn't want to atm.

  • safesound

    I'd love to HE and have no doubt I could (until primary school at least) but my 4 yo has Sen and part of that is not socialising well so I'd be concerned I couldn't supply the range of socialization he needs. Plus I'm a bit of an introvert so I'm concerned I'd end up isolating him.

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