Many Seven Year Olds Have Spent The Equivalent Of An Entire Year Infront Of A Screen

30 September 2015

Screen Time

How strict are you about screen time in your house?

We're pretty relaxed in our house. Although my kids would probably beg to differ, as they're not allowed on screens of any type (including the TV) before school in the morning, and I know they think that's pretty harsh.

But yet more research into the perils of screen time and the damage it can do to developing brains has persuaded me that I'm right to stick to my no-screens-before-school rule.

The Telegraph reports:

"Data from research specialist Childwisepublished in the past week reveals that by the age of seven many youngsters will have spent what equates to one full year in front of a screen, rising to three by adulthood. That is a terrifying statistic.

A Channel 4 News poll found that almost half of parents admitted their children spend too much time in front of a screen, with 43 per cent saying this amounts to an emotional dependency."

One full year in front of a screen by the age of seven. That's worrying, no? I go into complete panic mode at the idea of my kids having 'an emotional dependency' on screen time but I know we all try to balance the dangers of excessive screen time with real-life practicalities.

I can honestly say that I'd never get a meal cooked in this house if I didn't let my daughter watch Bing as often as she does. It's not going to win me any parenting awards and I know I'm not the only mum to feel guilty about such things.

I guess all we can do is try to implement healthy screen time limits, pay careful attention to how much time our little ones are actually spending in front of screens - it's easy to lose track, sometimes - and try to limit our own 'emotional dependency' on screens in order to set a good example.

We'd love to hear your thoughts on this story over on our Facebook page. How do you manage screen time in your house, and what tips would you share for limiting hours little ones spend on screens?

TOPICS:   Parents

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